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Neurology Xagena

Evidence does not support the use of Creatine for neuroprotection against Parkinson’s disease


Creatine is an antioxidant agent that has shown neuroprotective effects in animal models of Parkinson's disease. Creatine was selected by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke ( NINDS ) as a possible disease modifying agent for Parkinson’s disease. Therefore, many clinical trials evaluated the efficacy of Creatine for patients with Parkinson’s disease.

The aim of a systematic review and meta-analysis was to synthesize evidence from published randomized controlled trials ( RCTs ) about the efficacy of Creatine for patients with Parkinson’s disease.

Researchers included RCTs comparing Creatine with placebo in terms of motor functions and quality of life. Outcomes of total Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale ( UPDRS ), UPDRS I, UPDRS II, and UPDRS III were pooled as mean difference between two groups from baseline to the endpoint.

Three randomized controlled trials ( n=1935 ) were included in this study. The overall effect did not favor either of the two groups in terms of: UPDRS total score ( mean difference 1.07, 95% CI [ 3.38 to 1.25 ], UPDRS III ( MD 0.62, 95% CI [ 2.27 to 1.02 ] ), UPDRS II ( MD 0.03, 95% CI [ 0.81 to 0.86 ], or UPDRS I ( MD 0.03, 95% CI [ 0.33 to 0.28 ] ).

In conclusion, current evidence does not support the use of Creatine for neuroprotection against Parkinson’s disease. Future well-designed, randomized controlled trials are needed. ( Xagena )

Attia A et al, CNS Neurol Disord Drug Targets 2016; Epub ahead of print

XagenaMedicine_2016



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